Welcome to the 2015 Homepage of the
MUCIN BIOLOGY GROUPS
(MUCINBIOLOGISKA GRUPPERNA)
THIS IS THE COMMON HOMEPAGE OF THE TWO MUCIN BIOLOGY GROUPS
GUNNAR C. HANSSON GROUP
MALIN E.V. JOHANSSON GROUP
MBC - Mucus, Bacteria and Colitis SSF Center, click to the right
KAW - Knut and Alice Wallenberg Center, click to the right
Lederhausen's Center for Cystic Fibrosis Research, click to the right
at the
University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden
 
NEWS JANUARY 2015:
Mucins in Health and Disease Conference July 18th – 22nd 2015 Robinson College, Cambridge, UK
The 'Cambridge' meeting is scheduled, please mark in your calendar. This time we will include introductory talks and seminars for newcomers in the field and students. For further details contact conference secretary Gursharn Hutchins: gursharn.hutchins@kcl.ac.uk
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PUBLICATION IN EMBO REPORTS
PRESS RELEASE: Protection of the mouse gut by mucus depends on microbes
The quality of the colon mucus in mice depends on the composition of gut microbiota, reports a Swedish team of researchers from the University of Gothenburg. The work, published in EMBO reports, suggests that bacteria in the gut affect mucus barrier properties in ways that can have implications for health and disease. “Genetically similar mice with subtle but stable and transmissible intestinal microbiota showed unexpectedly large differences in the inner colon mucus layer. The composition of the gut microbiota has significant effects on mucus properties,” says Malin E.V. Johansson from the University of Gothenburg who led the study. By sequencing the microbiota and examining the 16S ribosomal RNA genes, the researchers discovered that two mouse colonies maintained in two different rooms in the same specific pathogen-free facility had different gut microbiota. They also had a mucus structure that was specific for each colony. Whereas one colony developed mucus that was not penetrable to bacteria, the other colony had an inner mucus layer permeable to bacteria. Each group of mice had a stable population of bacteria that could be maternally transmitted: The group with impenetrable mucus had increased amounts of Erysipelotrichi bacteria, while the other group had higher levels of Proteobacteria and TM7 bacteria in the distal colon mucus. Free-living mice from the forest had mucus similar in composition to that found in mice in the non-penetrable colony. The authors also showed that the bacterial composition could be modulated to a small extent through the diet. “The results from the free-living mice strongly argue for the importance of a well-developed inner mucus layer that efficiently separates bacteria from the host epithelium for the overall health of the mice,” says Johansson. The different mucus properties were recreated by transplanting the microbial communities into germ-free mice. “After recolonisation of germ-free mice with the different microbiota we observed the same structural and functional differences in their mucus properties,” added Johansson. Mucus is our outermost barrier to our microbiota in the gut. If the mucus fails to offer a protective barrier it can allow more bacteria to come in contact with our epithelium in a way that can trigger colon inflammation. Diseases such as ulcerative colitis show an increased incidence in the Western world and this study emphasizes the importance of the composition of the microbiota for an impenetrable protective mucus barrier. Jakobsson, H. E., Rodriguez-Pineiro, A. M., Schütte, A., Ermund, A., Boysen, P., Sommer, F., Bäckhed, F., Hansson, G. C., and Johansson M. E. V. (2014) The gut microbiota composition impairs the colon inner mucus layer barrier. EMBO Reports in press.
http://embor.embopress.org/content/early/2014/12/17/embr.201439263
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REVIEW Malin E. Johansson. Mucus Layers in Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Inflamm.Bowel.Dis., 2014.
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REVIEW Pelaseyed, T., Bergström, J. H., Gustafsson, J. K., Ermund, A., Birchenough, G. M. H., Schütte, A. van der Post, S, Svensson, F., Rodríguez-Piñeiro, A. M., Nyström, E. E.L., Wising, C., Johansson, M. E.V., and Hansson, G. C. (2014) The mucus and mucins of the goblet cells and enterocytes provide the first defense line of the gastrointestinal tract and interact with the immune system. Immunol. Rev., 260, 8-20.
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van der Post, S. and Hansson, G.C. (2014). Membrane protein profiling of human colon reveals distinct regional differences. Mol.Cell.Proteomics on-line
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Publication in JNCI; Journal of National Cancer Institute and Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci USA: see below
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SEE and LISTEN to us at:
  • Gordon Conference: Cilia, Mucus & Mucociliary Interactions. Galveston, TX. February 8-14 2015 (GCH)
  • Gordon COnference: Saliva, Galveston, TX. February 15-20 2015 (GCH)
  • Keystone Symposia: Gut microbiota modulation of host physiology – Search for mechanisms. Keystone, CO. March 1-6 2015 (GCH)
  • 4th International Symposium of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), Heidelberg, Germany, June 25 to 27, 2015 (GCH)


RECENT PUBLICATIONS (2014)
  • Hannan, T.J., Roberts, P.J., Riehl, T.E., van der Post, S., Binkley, J. M., Schwartz, D.J., Miyoshi, H., Mack, M., Schwendener, R.A., Hooton, T.M., Stappenbeck, T.S., Hansson, G.C., Stenson, W.F., Colonna, M., Stapleton, A.E. and Hultgren, S.J. (2014) Inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 prevents chronic and recurrent bladder infection. EBioMedicine, 2014.10.011
  • van der Post, S., Thomsson, K.A., and Hansson, G. C. (2014) A multiple enzyme approach for the characterization of glycan modifications on the C-Terminus of the intestinal MUC2 mucin. J. Proteome Res., 13, 6013-6023.
  • Ermund, A., Meiss, L., Scholte, B. J., and Hansson G. C. (2015) Hypertonic saline releases the attached small intestinal cystic fibrosis mucus. Clin. Exp. Pharm. Physiol. 42, 69-75.
  • Gustafsson, J. K., Linden, S. K., Alwan, A. H., Scholte, B. J., Hansson, G. C., and Sjovall, H. (2015) Carbachol-induced colonic mucus formation requires transport via NKCC1, K channels and CFTR. Pflugers Arch., DOI 10.1007/s00424-014-1595-y.
  • Johansson, M. E. V. (2014) Mucus Layers in Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Inflamm.Bowel.Dis.
  • Sadio, A. Gustafsson, J. K, Pereira, B., Gomes, C.P., Hansson, G. C., David, L., Pego, A. P., and Almeida, R. (2014) Modified-Chitosan/siRNA Nanoparticles Downregulate Cellular CDX2 Expression and Cross the Gastric Mucus Barrier. PLoS ONE 9 (6):e99449, 2014.
  • Berström, J. H., Berg, K. A., Rodriguez-Pineiro, A. M., Stecher, B., Johansson, M. E. V., and Hansson, G. C. (2014) AGR2, nn endoplasmic reticulum protein is secreted into the gastrointestinal mucus. PLoS ONE 9 (8):e104186.
  • van der Post, S. and Hansson, G.C. (2014). Membrane protein profiling of human colon reveals distinct regional differences. Mol.Cell.Proteomics on-line.
  • Schütte, A., Ermund, A., Becker-Pauly, C., Johansson, M.E.V., Rodriguez-Pineiro, A. M., Bäckhed, Müller, F.S., Lottaz, D., Bond, J.S., and Hansson, G.C. (2014) Microbial Induced Meprin ß Cleavage in MUC2 Mucin and Functional CFTR Channel are Required to Release Anchored Small Intestinal Mucus. Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.USA in press
  • Pelaseyed, T., Bergström, J. H., Gustafsson, J. K., Ermund, A., Birchenough, G. M. H., Schütte, A. van der Post, S, Svensson, F., Rodríguez-Piñeiro, A. M., Nyström, E. E.L., Wising, C., Johansson, M. E.V., and Hansson, G. C. (2014) The mucus and mucins of the goblet cells and enterocytes provide the first defense line of the gastrointestinal tract and interact with the immune system. Immunol. Rev., 260, 8-20.
  • Wenzel, U.A., Magnusson, M. K., Rydström, A., Jonstrand, C., Hengst, J., Johansson, M.E.V., Velcich, A., Öhman, L., Strid, H., Sjövall, H., Hansson, G.C., and Wick, M.J. (2014) Spontaneous colitis in Muc2-deficient mice reflects clinical and cellular features of active ulcerative colitis. PLoS ONE, 9, e100217.
  • Nilsson, H. E., Ambort, D., Backstrom, M., Thomsson, E., Koeck, P. J., Hansson, G. C., and Hebert, H. (2014) Intestinal MUC2 mucin supramolecular topology by packing and release resting on D3 domain assembly. J.Mol.Biol. 426, 2567-2579
  • Jabbar, K. S., Verbeke, C., Hyltander, A. G., Sjovall, H., Hansson, G. C., and Sadik, R. (2014) Proteomic Mucin Profiling for the Identification of Cystic Precursors of Pancreatic Cancer. J.Natl.Cancer Inst. 106, djt439. IMPACT 14.3
  • Johansson, M.E.V. and Hansson, G.C. (2014) Is the intestinal goblet cell a major immune cell? CELL H&M, 15, 251-
  • Johansson, M. E. V., Gustafsson, J. K., Holmen-Larsson, J., Jabbar, K. S., Xia, L., Xu, H., Ghishan, F. K., Carvalho, F. A., Gewirtz, A. T., Sjövall, H., and Hansson, G. C. (2014) Bacteria penetrate the normally impenetrable inner colon mucus layer in both murine colitis models and in patients with ulcerative colitis. Gut 63, 281-291.
  • Xiao, F., Yu, Q., Li, J., Johansson, M. E., Singh, A. K., Xia, W., Riederer, B., Engelhardt, R., Montrose, M., Soleimani, M., Tian, D. A., Xu, G., Hansson, G. C., and Seidler, U. (2014) Slc26a3 deficiency is associated with loss of colonic HCO secretion, absence of a firm mucus layer, and barrier impairment in mice. Acta Physiol (Oxf), on -line,
  • Sommer, F., Adam, N., Johansson, M. E. V., Xia, L., Hansson, G. C., and Bäckhed, F. (2014) Altered mucus glycosylation in core 1 O-glycan-deficient mice affects microbiota composition and intestinal architecture. PLoS ONE 9, e85254